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Magalluf
Dear Sir,
We have read with interest the many letters and articles regarding the ‘prostitutes’ of Magalluf and other resorts. As a family we have been visiting Majorca for over 35 years, sometimes 2 or 3 times a year, but this year will be our last.
We, too, are tired of having to leave our evening enjoyment early, just to avoid these women who appear at midnight, on the dot. We have watched, from the hotel balcony, these women being arrested, only for them to reappear the next night. Calvia Council know what they have to do to rid the resort of this nuisance but choose to ignore the situation. When parts of the resort are trying to become a high class destination, it is a shame that the powers that be do not want to encourage them. We have noticed that the higher class hotels do not state that they are in Magalluf, but just give the area as Calvia. What a disappointment their guests must feel when they find out the truth. During the day the ‘lookie lookie men’ are becoming a total nuisance and the PR people from the bars are returning to the streets in spite of supposedly needing a licence. There is a lot to clean up in this resort but nothing seems to be happening and, sadly, it may already be too late.
Mrs P Andrews

Dear Sir,
Your reader who stated that they would never return to Majorca, having had a bad experience in Magalluf, should not have been there in the first place.
The island is surrounded by so many other beautiful resorts that not returning here because Magalluf was a disaster is absurd.
Anyone over 21 with the requisite number of brain cells knows that Magalluf is not the place for their holiday. It is so frequently mentioned in the international media as the no-go area on the island I am astonished that people still aim for the place.
If they and others like them shunned Magalluf and visited cleaner, safer holiday spots, the hotels and bars in Magalluf might get a heads-up as their businesses decline and they finally stop serving drunk customers and persuade Calvia Council to take control, establishing permanent police presence. The police might make a supreme effort and get the prostitutes and drug dealers off the streets. The two fearsome-looking black-clad Policia Nacional guardias I saw this morning roaring around on their motorbikes, heavily laden with serious weaponry, would be of better use there than writing parking tickets along the Paseo Maritimo.
Name withheld by request