You would have thought that the European Union would have had something to say about the crisis in Catalonia. In fact, not even 50,000 people marching past their door calling for independence prompted a response. As far as the European Union is concerned it is an internal Spanish matter and they can’t get involved. To some extent they are right but to some extent they are wrong. Surely a dispute of this scale and size demands at least a comment from the European Union.

I would say that the EU would be a good body to mediate in the dispute between nationalists who want independence and the Spanish government. At the moment Spain is awaiting the outcome of local elections in Catalonia. Polls say that pro-union political parties will win, but the problem isn’t going to go away. Catalonia is effectively split between those wanting independence and those who want to stay a part of Spain. The Spanish governmet is never going to bring both sides together, so perhaps the European Union should be given an opportunity.

Someone needs to do something because the crisis in Catalonia has hit the Spanish economy and also political activity not connected with Catalonia has come to a standstill. The European Union cannot sit on the fence any longer. This is not just some minor dispute involving a member state. It is a crisis involving a major Spanish province with a bigger economy than Portugal.

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Andy Rawson / Hace over 3 years

The EU aren't interested in Catshit.

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Richard Pearson / Hace over 3 years

Yes there is and most of it is a lot of tosh. It starts going downhill after he claims that Luxembourg is Europe’s smallest nation. It isn’t, Malta is. He has a fixation about Franco and so called fascist parties, forgetting that the man died over 40 years ago. He claims that the Ciudadanos leaders have fascist family members whilst forgetting to mention Marta Rovira, leader of the ERC Patty whose grandparents were fascist Lord Mayors. He claims that Ciudadanos is a substitute for a right wing party but conveniently forgets to mention that just over a year ago they signed a pact of alliance with the socialist PSOE party. And as for Albert Rivera being regularly seen naked .........please ! That was a campaign poster when the only people who knew him were his parents and neighbours.

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S.O. / Hace over 3 years

Plenty to read here: http://www.matthewparish.com/news.html

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Richard Pearson / Hace over 3 years

Of course the other question that should be asked is whether the parties that support independence will accept the results if they lose votes and the combination of all of them is less than 50% of the total votes cast.

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Richard Pearson / Hace over 3 years

Madrid will have no alternative than to accept the election results.

What the parties that seek independence will do if by forming a coalition they have a majority in the Catalan parliament, is another matter.

They know that if they declare independence again Madrid will impose direct rule, but they will probably gamble that it will be worth while hoping that a new central government will let them nearly have their own way.

Unfortunately talking will not solve the problem, only pretty drastic measures will.

Shortly all eyes will be on Macron to see how he approaches the Corse problem.

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V. / Hace over 3 years

Henry: I agree with Richard although I think his second paragraph is somewhat misleading. I read it to imply that if the pro-independence parties win, Madrid will not respect the election results (or maybe I’m mis-reading). That isn’t so, Madrid have to respect the results just as the pro-independence parties will also have to respect the Constitution and not attempt another UDI. If they don’t comply with that then as Richard says article 155 will continue to be applied. Proper dialogue is desperately needed as Catalan society is now so divided, but I don’t hold out much hope in the foreseeable future.

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Richard Pearson / Hace over 3 years

Good question, which the Catalan politicians are asking themselves as well.

If this did occur, Madrid has already threatened to impose direct rule using article 155 of the Constitution, which it has already imposed temporarily, on a permanent basis.

What would happen if there is a change of government in Madrid is anyone’s guess.

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Henry James / Hace over 3 years

V. Fair enough but what happens if pro-independence politicians are elected yet again,including members of the former government,who indicate that they are going to stand and may yet be able to do so.?

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Richard Pearson / Hace over 3 years

V, correct.

And just to refresh other readers memories, Spain has 17 autonomous regions ( 15 on the mainland plus the Canary and Balearic Islands ) each of which has its own parliament and government. A bit like Scotland but multiplied by 17.

Calaluña though, has a lot more local power than Ms Sturgeon could even dream for.

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V. / Hace over 3 years

Henry, it is not a referendum! The Spanish government has called elections to the Catalan parliament. These are not to determine whether Catalonia wishes to remain part of Spain or not, although the separatists would like to think they are. They are to elect a new Catalan Government. A referendum is something quite different and the Spanish government is certainly not going to call one on the terms you suggest as they consider that the Constitution doesn’t allow it.

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