On Monday evening as former Catalan president Carles Puigdemont was being escorted into police custody after having appeared before a German judge, a Majorcan friend of mine was delighted. I was quite surprised.

He comes from a long-standing and relatively high-profile Soller family and he said that his parents would have turned in their graves had Puigdemont been allowed to get away with his, what has become, caper. It would be highly amusing if it was not so serious. You couldn’t write the script: 12 members of the Spanish secret services shadowing him around Europe, electronic tracers on his cars, etc. Just bring in James Bond before Britain leaves Europe.

So, back to the real world. This proud, extremely well-travelled and multilingual Majorcan quite simply explained to me that he and his family are and always have been Majorcans, not Catalans. He speaks Majorcan. And the fact that while Barcelona burned, only 400 activists staged a protest in Palma backs up his sentiment to a certain degree - how many of them were Catalans living here in Majorca?

There is a certain amount of sympathy for the Catalan independence movement in the corridors of Balearic power, but on the whole I don’t see great support from the Majorcans nor an appetite for independence in the islands. I think the water between here and Barcelona should be kept well clear.

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Richard Pearson / Hace over 3 years

Good, I hope that makes you happy.

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Pollensa1946 / Hace over 3 years

Oh, I have no doubt where you stand.

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Richard Pearson / Hace over 3 years

You may be right. He would probably do a better job than the current lot.

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Pollensa1946 / Hace over 3 years

"Richard Pearson / Hace 1 day... What’s wrong with having 12 security forces following him ?"

You would be right at home in the company of the old Caudillo, Richard.

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Chris / Hace over 3 years

Jaime - Thank you for this information. I have been coming to Mallorca for a long time now, mainly Port de Pollença but I was in Palma last week. I've never really seen Mallorquin written down to compare it with Catalan. But now I know why I have seen Sa Calobra as La Calobra!

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Jaime Moya / Hace over 3 years

Sorry I meant as V posted, rather than TG.

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Jaime Moya / Hace over 3 years

Chris – It’s a very complicated and controversial subject but as TG says standard Catalan is what is taught in schools and used on all official documentation, including websites etc., even though it isn’t what people in Mallorca actually speak. Whether Mallorquin is a dialect of Catalan or whether they are both variants of a predecessor language is also up for debate - although I am no philologist so I leave that to the professionals. Mallorquin is in real danger of being written out of existence, not by Castellano but by Catalan. You can see simple examples of this yourself everywhere, where old street signs using the Mallorquin articles are being slowly replaced by those using the Catalan ones. E.g. Where the article ‘Sa’ is replaced by ‘La’. As I mentioned in my earlier post - I never, ever heard the language in Mallorca referred to as anything other than Mallorqui as a kid and have yet to personally hear any self-respecting Mallorquin refer to themselves as Catalan. It would be like a Breton describing themselves as Welsh, or an Australian describing themselves as English!

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Chris / Hace over 3 years

Thanks you V. Could you tell me how teaching Mallorquí would differ to Catalan? I cant see the the problem (as an outsider from the UK) with the use of the Mallorquí.

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V. / Hace over 3 years

TG / Chris: Mallorcan (mallorquí) is one of the several dialects of the Catalan language. They teach standard Catalan in schools but Mallorcan is the commonly spoken dialect here.

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Chris / Hace over 3 years

TG - as Jaime Moya says, is it not Mallorquin language being forced into Mallorcan education, government and hospital sectors?

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