Well, even if the Brits might find things more expensive in 2017, there are the other nationalities. | Teresa Ayuga

There is no doubt that this year has been a record one for the tourist industry, but the future may not be looking that rosy. Few captains of industry have denied that Majorca has been the main beneficiary of the security issues in other parts of the Mediterranean, in particular Egypt, Turkey and Tunisia.

But both Egypt and Turkey have made a sterling effort to get their tourist industries off the ground again while Greece, having dropped its prices, has also enjoyed a bumper summer. So, come next year, Majorca’s competition could be back on the market.

One leading British tourist industry source told the Bulletin today that Egypt has fantastic new hotels, attractions and facilities and that it will not take long before people start returning.

But the biggest problem for Majorca is going to be price. Already famed for having some of the highest hotel rates in Spain, never mind Europe, they could be about to get even more costly, especially for Britons and non-Eurozone residents.

It appears that hotel rates in Majorca are going to go up by 15 per cent next year, or have already done so in the brochures that have been published. Couple these to the fact that the pound is currently ten per cent weaker against the euro and that equates to a 25 per cent increase in the cost of a holiday in Majorca - not to mention that UK visitors will be ten per cent worse off in their pockets once they get here.

The exchange rate could turn around and the pound could regain its strength, taking the edge off the holiday costs, but with Brexit still to be activated between now and next summer, the reverse could happen and a further slump in value could occur. And that will either price Majorca out of many people’s budgets or simply fuel an expansion in the all-inclusive market.There is no doubt that this year has been a record one for the tourist industry, but the future may not be looking that rosy. Few captains of industry have denied that Majorca has been the main beneficiary of the security issues in other parts of the Mediterranean, in particular Egypt, Turkey and Tunisia.

But both Egypt and Turkey have made a sterling effort to get their tourist industries off the ground again while Greece, having dropped its prices, has also enjoyed a bumper summer. So, come next year, Majorca’s competition could be back on the market.

One leading British tourist industry source told the Bulletin today that Egypt has fantastic new hotels, attractions and facilities and that it will not take long before people start returning.

But the biggest problem for Majorca is going to be price. Already famed for having some of the highest hotel rates in Spain, never mind Europe, they could be about to get even more costly, especially for Britons and non-Eurozone residents.

It appears that hotel rates in Majorca are going to go up by 15 per cent next year, or have already done so in the brochures that have been published. Couple these to the fact that the pound is currently ten per cent weaker against the euro and that equates to a 25 per cent increase in the cost of a holiday in Majorca - not to mention that UK visitors will be ten per cent worse off in their pockets once they get here.

The exchange rate could turn around and the pound could regain its strength, taking the edge off the holiday costs, but with Brexit still to be activated between now and next summer, the reverse could happen and a further slump in value could occur. And that will either price Majorca out of many people’s budgets or simply fuel an expansion in the all-inclusive market.