Be prepared for some queues at Palma airport. | Majorca Daily Bulletin reporter

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Spanish authorities announced last week that they would be allowing for the return of unvaccinated passengers from April 6 - but quickly made a u-turn in their decision and updated the guidance to include only two groups.

After a brief sigh of relief for many passengers, the Spanish tourist office announced that the guidance was as a result of a misinterpretation of government advice.

The latest advice from the Foreign Office is for UK travellers coming to Mallorca is:

The documentation you must present on entry when travelling from the UK to Spain is determined by your reason for travel.

If you are traveling to Spain for tourism you must show valid proof of one of the following:

being fully vaccinated (with both doses of a two-dose vaccine or one dose of a one-dose vaccine) at least 14 days prior to arrival in Spain (date(s) of vaccination must be specified). See ‘If you’re fully vaccinated’.
having recovered from COVID-19 in the last 6 months. You can also use a medical certificate or recovery record to prove your COVID-19 status on entry to Spain. See ‘If you’ve had COVID-19 in the past year’.
There are some different entry requirements for children under 12 years old and those aged 12 to 17 inclusive. See ‘Children and young people’

EU citizens and accompanying family members of an EU citizen (including those travelling for tourism purposes), residents of Spain, or those covered by one of the other exemptions listed may present alternative documentation to the vaccine certificate. See Exemptions

Spain has a Travel Health Control form which you must complete no more than 48 hours before travel to Spain, unless you have a digital COVID-19 certificate. See Spain’s Ministry of Health travel pages for more detail.

You may also be subject to additional checks at the point of entry including a temperature check, visual health assessment, or testing on arrival. Passengers may also be contacted and required to undertake a COVID-19 nucleic acid amplification test - NAAT (PCR or similar) at any point up to 48 hours after their arrival in Spain. More information can be found on the Spanish government’s Border Health Controls webpage.

Everyone (excluding children under the age of 12 years old, see Children and young people) arriving into Spain who have visited a ‘risk country’ in the previous 14 days must meet the requirements on the Spanish Ministry of Health Travel and COVID-19 page. The Spanish government reviews their ‘risk countries’ list every 7 days.

Requirements are country specific. You may get a minimum fine of €3000 if you do not comply with the requirements.

If you are travelling from a country where Spain has travel restrictions, check with the Spanish Embassy in that country before you travel to Spain. Due to current travel restrictions, you may be questioned on arrival by Spanish border authorities to ensure you meet the legal entry requirements. Spanish border authorities only allow entry if they are satisfied that you meet the entry requirements, and reserve the right to deny passage.

Spain’s land borders are open, but there may be travel restrictions, border controls and testing requirements depending on the country you are travelling from. For further details see If you’re transiting through Spain.

All travellers should follow the advice of the local authorities on how best to protect themselves and others, including any measures that they bring in to control the virus. See the Coronavirus section for further information.

Plan ahead in case you present symptoms or test positive for COVID-19 during your stay in Spain, see Be prepared for your plans to change and Testing positive for COVID-19 while in Spain.